#GirlsTrip – Where we ate in Philly

TL;DRPhilly’s food scene is legit. Check out the BYO places (BYO brunch, what?!) and epic happy hours (see Double Knot below) and make a reso at one of the fancier…

TL;DRPhilly’s food scene is legit. Check out the BYO places (BYO brunch, what?!) and epic happy hours (see Double Knot below) and make a reso at one of the fancier neighborhood places. Loosen your belt loop a notch and enjoy!

Before we dive in

A little background – it’s been FIFTEEN YEARS since we graduated high school! Man those years have flown. What started as a Facebook post about a new food hall in Brooklyn escalated pretty quickly into a trip to the East Coast.

Scattered across the country since graduation, the four of us have not been in the same place together since… senior year when Alani came to visit us (she left us a year early). We’ve all come a long way since those days sitting under the library during lunch. College. Marriage. More College. Kids. It’s wild to think how long I’ve known these girls. 🙂

Flying in

Aside from Kristy, who lives in Philly and let us all crash at her place (thanks!!), we flew in. Alani from San Francisco, Karen from Minneapolis, and me from Hawaii. I expected epic jetlag the first few days, but my new strategy worked and we were all up and eating shake shack at 11pm because #vacay.

We crammed a LOT into those two days. Thanks once again to Kristy for being our tour guide and planning everything! She made sure we were able to see a ton for such a short trip.

 

Reading Terminal Market

While it’s a bit of a tourist trap, I’m still a sucker for a good food hall. We started off at Dutch Eating Place and Beiler’s Doughnuts in Reading Terminal Market. The turkey sandwich was delish, but the apple dumplings are what I’d go back for. Skip all the cake doughnuts at Beiler’s and go straight for the Fritters (blueberry or apple). The line can be long, but it moves fast and those fritters are legit. They were super fresh and reminded me of a combo between a malasada and a doughnut. This is also a cool spot to swing by for omiyage since there’s so many little Philly-only shops.

Chinatown and City Center Quick Eats

Philly has a LOT to offer in terms of shopping and eating. In the City Center, you’ll find Shake Shack, Uniqlo as well as all the standard retailers (H&M, Sephora, etc). Chinatown Square is a new-ish food hall that opened up with HALAL GUYS (!) and the original rolled ice cream place from NYC (I-CE-NY). We walked through, but since we just ate didn’t pick anything up (plus, we would be in NYC in a few days). We did manage to fit in a trip to Shake Shack, even though it was at 11pm.

Double Knot

Aside from the quick service places, there’s a huge foodie scene and tons of restaurants that are BYO (bring your own alcohol and no corkage = amazing). On our first night, we had happy hour at Double Knot, where the happy hour menu plates and drinks were $4! The food was amazing and the four of us left super full and a bit tipsy with a tab under $50.

Cheesesteak

What’s Philly without a cheesesteak!? We went to Jim’s but were a bit disappointed. The line was long, and while that gave us time to google the right words to order, it also maybe added to the hype. We’ll have to try one of the other places next time. The meat was more like ground beef and a bit flavorless. Maybe we should’ve had it whiz wit afterall.

Noord

We had dinner at Noord on the second night – Scandinavian fare. I had rabbit for the first time (and it was delish, sorry bunnies) and wow the bread here. I probably could’ve survived on just the bread, but the rest of the food was amazing as well. I’m usually not a huge raw fish person unless it’s poke, but the salmon was tasty! It was another BYO place and we brought 2 bottles of wine and took our time enjoying the food and the company. 🙂 The restaurant is small, but they do take reservations.

Honey’s Sit N Eat

Who knew that BYO BRUNCH places exist? Philly, definitely doing it right! Brought some champagne and made mimosas, because #vacay. We got the toad in a hole, corned beef and eggs and the honey cristo. The honey cristo was my fave because the sweet and savory was perfect – and it was topped with a sunny egg. Perfection. Toad in a hole was also delish, but a little too much cheese for me to handle *pops lactaid*.

La Colombe

After brunch, we went to the La Colombe in Fishtown. It was huuuuuge and this neighborhood 100% reminded me of Williamsburg. The guy at the register was even wearing plaid and had a handlebar mustache. Haha. If you haven’t been to a La Colombe (in Philly or in NYC) you should definitely check it out. Their draft lattes and cold brew (you can get a black and tan which is half cold brew and half draft latte) are delish.

Federal Donuts

Anyone who knows me knows how I feel about donuts – but did you know that I actually do NOT like cake donuts? I mean, does anyone even like them? Hahaha. Moving on. Kristy said that we have to try this place, as she also doesn’t like cake donuts, but loves these! So we gave them a shot. We got a fancy (smores) as well as their standard hot and fresh (Cinnamon) – and okay, fine. I’m mayyyyybe sold – but only on the hot and fresh. 😉 The fancy was okay, but too sweet and too many things going on for me.

Talula’s Garden

A half-open garden / half-inside restaurant, we came here for dinner on our last night in the City. This one, although not BYO, is a place I would definitely come back to. We sat and had a drink at the garden bar before we moved inside for dinner. We ordered the Ricotta Gnudi, Berkshire Pork Belly, Collard Greens, and Overnight Bone-In Short Rib. The pork belly was melt-in-your-mouth amazing. Seriously. Their menu changes often, so definitely check in with the servers on what’s popular for the type of food you’re craving.

Heh. Alani also sneakily told the server that it was my birthday. 🙂 It was our last dinner together, so it was kind of a perfect send-off.


It was an amazing weekend that I seriously should’ve written about earlier. I can’t believe it’s already been so long! While we were there, Kristy was taking part in the Holoholo Lens Project a neat traveling photography project coordinated by Ricky Li. You can check out her pics here: Kristy’s Holoholo Lens Project photos.


Heading to Philly?

I created a quick google map of everywhere we ate.

Map of our Philly Adventures

Map of our Philly Adventures

 

No Comments on #GirlsTrip – Where we ate in Philly

Finally figured out my solution to jetlag

Being born and raised in Hawaii has its perks – but traveling is not one of them. Going anywhere outside of the state requires a 5-hour flight, minimum. Living in NYC for 4 years also meant a LOT of 10.5 hour flights across four time zones to go home for holidays and weddings – sometimes for just a weekend.

TL;DR

Fast for at least 12 hours and eat your first meal during meal time in your destination’s timezone. Avoid light before and during your flight. Soak in all the light during the day and dim your lights in early evening for the first few days.

East is a beast

Being born and raised in Hawaii has its perks – but traveling is not one of them. Going anywhere outside of the state requires a 5-hour flight, minimum. Living in NYC for 4 years also meant a LOT of 10.5 hour flights across four time zones to go home for holidays and weddings – sometimes for just a weekend.

I’ve tried a ton of ways to get over jet lag. Read every “how to cure jet lag” post on the Internets, and honestly still struggled with it every time I flew.

My problem? The advice given is useful, but not very practical. I mean, seriously? Who has time to start moving back their sleep schedule the week before a trip? Don’t you people work? Hahaha. This week, I flew over to NYC for an epic #girlstrip, and the week before I left was: 4 hours of sleep every night, scrambling on work projects and the insane task of getting to Japan. So no. I definitely was not in bed by 8pm and waking up at 4am.

Fasting and Light Exposure

That being said – there was one consistent piece of advice on several blogs that I have never tried before: Fast and control your exposure to light. Maybe it’s because I hate saying no to free food (yes, even airplane food) and in my youth, I was self-conscious about looking weird on a flight.

As I’ve gotten older (hello 30’s) I’ve not only cared less about things, I’ve also experienced next level jetlag, likely because I just don’t recover like I used to (hello 3-day hangovers). Since all four of us only have this one weekend together, I decided I’d do everything I could to minimize the jetlag and extend our QT.

Fasting

In terms of eating, I ate lunch around 1pm and made sure to eat something pretty substantial. I drank a ton of water and passed up the free dinner offered on the flight. Tried my best to sleep for most of the flight, but the crying kid 2 rows back + guy behind me tapping like a crazy person on his video screen wasn’t exactly helpful.

Light Exposure

I also opted to look like a crazy person wearing sunglasses (these were actually blue light blocking glasses) from the moment I got to the airport until we were at cruising altitude which is when I switched it up with an eye mask.

Our flight was delayed almost 2 hours, so that was a LONG journey. 12 hours sitting on that plane. I ate the fruit and had some herbal tea at 6am NYC time, but left the sunglasses on until I got on the train at 9am.

Results

Day 1

All things considered, I didn’t nod off on the train to Philly or even feel too tired. I met up with the girls and we were out and about until midnight. Fell asleep almost immediately and woke up at 8am the next day without an alarm.

Day 2

Usually day 2 is the worst for me – but this time I felt 100%! I didn’t have coffee. Repeat, NO COFFEE. Still survived our ~10 mile explorations around the City. Have to admit – I’m amazed and totally believe in this now.

If you haven’t tried fasting – give it a shot. Realistically, I probably don’t need to eat anything on flights anyway – my body’s not exactly in need of energy while I sit there not moving for 12 hours.

Any other tips that have worked for you guys?

1 Comment on Finally figured out my solution to jetlag

Modern Toilet – Eating from toilets in Taipei

Eating from toilets can be …fun? We checked out Modern Toilet in Taipei.

I’m sure you’re extremely concerned for my health right now and trying to think if you’ve shared food/drinks with me since we’ve been back from our trip. Right? Lol.

tl;dr: Modern Toilet is a theme restaurant that revolves around toilets, bathrooms, and everything poop. The food is decent (nothing to write home about), but the decor is #worthit. There are some novelties that are best experienced first hand!

So we’re sitting on the train and Ryan tells me that he really wants to check out this “poop restaurant”.  Of course, I’m in. We decided we’d check it out as soon as we got into Taipei, but our plans were foiled by an 11am open time (note to self: check opening times!).

Getting there

Since we were early, we meandered to the nearby Lungshan temple and when we were done decided to hop on the train for the quick one stop ride to Ximen station. From there it’s just five minutes, using Exit 6, walk 2 blocks North on Hanzhong Street then West until you see:

P1000772

Look at that building! So epic. We knew that there were only good things to come. Walking in, we realized the restaurant is pretty big, with multiple floors and seating for small and larger parties.

Yep, even the bathrooms are extra special. You sit on toilet seat chairs, over a poop bowl table and walk into the building to a chorus of interesting noises. We are obviously not normal since after this we were still starving and ready to order.

The food comes in various forms of poop and other bathroom paraphernalia. We ordered the ham & cheese stuffed chicken meal, fries, poop bread and ice cream.  They have a ton of different things to choose from – everything from hot pot and curries to spaghetti and au gratin.

Totally forgot to take photos of the menu, but found these pics on the internets.

2017-03-13 12.13.09

Overall, the food was good, but the experience was better. They had menus in English, but attracted a crowd of both locals and tourists alike. I would suggest coming early, since by the time we were leaving (closer to noon) it was starting to get crowded.

Modern Toilet (便所主題餐廳)

No. 46, Xining South Road, Wanhua District, Taipei City, Taiwan 108 / +886 2 2311 8822
Yelp / Trip Advisor

Hours: Mon-Fri 1130am – 10pm / Sat-Sun: 11am-10p

1 Comment on Modern Toilet – Eating from toilets in Taipei

We’re on a boat! A breakdown of our sea days on the Celebrity Millennium

Now that our family reunion posts have wrapped, back to your regularly scheduled programming: cruise recaps! Five days. That’s exactly how many full days we were on the open ocean,…

Now that our family reunion posts have wrapped, back to your regularly scheduled programming: cruise recaps!

Five days.

That’s exactly how many full days we were on the open ocean, with no Internet and nowhere to go. Alright, I’m totally exaggerating. If you remember from my post ages ago about the detailed daily itineraries the ship posts, then you’ll remember that they have multiple entertainment options at all times of the day. Also – the ship is HUGE.

Breakdown of all the decks on the Celebrity Millennium

Decks for days!

 

While most people on vacation would’ve been living it up, I was sorely missing my laptop! I could have been blogging in real time instead of attempting to catch up on it *cough* four months later *cough*.

That being said, we did get to spend a ton of quality time together with the fam, which was awesome. Lots of eating, playing games and just goofing off. Below is our highlight reel of ship events!

Eat. Eat. Eat.

We checked out the steak and pasta specialty restaurant (specialty = not included), but on most nights we were low key and just opted for the buffet at night. What can I say, we liked the variety. So much so that we usually went to the buffet even after we had dinner in the main dining room. Dessert parties, ftw!

While it’s neat to have room service as an option, room service choices were pretty limited, and the only time we really made use of it was when we ordered breakfast on port days. Beat the crowds in the buffet area + a whole carafe of coffee delivered at 630a = best ever! Also useful when you feel like hell because you caught what can only be the flu. Getting tea and water delivered throughout the day saved Ryan a few trips up and down (and let him leave the quarantine area knowing I was capable of picking up the phone).

Working off all the food

2017-03-11 16.53.51

Nothing quite like running while you stare out at endless ocean. On days when the water was really rough, going on the treadmill was basically impossible. The waves look tiny, but the captain reported they were around 17 feet!

2017-03-14 11.59.20

It’s hilarious because I never really go to the gym when we’re at home, but we went a bunch while on vacay. I’m sure part of it was because the in-laws are gym rats and I got the guilts knowing they were running at 5am!

We also checked out one of the “line dancing” classes – which turned out to really just be a zumba class. Not my favorite of classes, but we still had fun. Pretty sure we’re on that cruise DVD they hand out at the end since the guy was filming us for so long. Haha.

Ping Pong

2017-03-12 07.08.01

To Ryan’s delight, there was a ping pong tournament. There were some REAL competitive folks on this ship – talking about how they won previous ship tournaments and getting pretty aggressive. I held my own for …exactly half a round before being totally crushed. I swear if they had bowling alleys, though!

All the Games

What cruise experience is complete without BINGO? Hahaha. What can I say – we never stayed up long enough to check out those “young people next gen parties” and we instead got excited for trivia, bingo and playing volleyball on the xbox.

20170319_125204

There was also a pretty lonely basketball court up on the top deck. The winds were pretty chilly most of the time, but Ryan went up and played.

2017-03-11 15.08.04

I’m not really much of a gambler, but there was a casino on one of the decks. We played one of those crazy addicting coin drop games in there for a bit, and maybe even a few slots, but I didn’t jump in on any of the card tables, though Ry played cards for a bit.

Show(s)

2017-03-12 03.22.38

Really, we caught ONE show – a magic show that was surprisingly good. There were different shows every night, but usually by the time we were done with dinner (and buffet dessert!) we were ready to have someone roll us back to our rooms for a nap.

Spa Day

All the wives (Ryan’s mom, sister and myself) went to get our nails done the day before we had the super fancy night. The nail tech did a great job, but for a standard manicure it was something like $60. Crazytown. It was a fun experience, especially since it was a one of our last sea days and there wasn’t a ton of other things we wanted to do, but I have to admit that was $$$$$ for just a mani!

All the things we didn’t use

There were actually a ton of other amenities that we didn’t really use much. Being on a cruise through Asia in March meant temps in the 40 degree range on the decks which really dampened our desire to hop in the pool.

  • Multiple pools and jacuzzis
  • Shopping deck
  • Outdoor movie area
  • Library

Overall

I think Ryan will agree with me, that while the cruise was fun, it’d be better to either have less sea days, or be on a bigger ship. I kind of wish there was a zipline or a rock climbing wall! I’d probably also bring my laptop next time – even if I’m not online, I swear it’s my security blanket these days.

No Comments on We’re on a boat! A breakdown of our sea days on the Celebrity Millennium

Our family reunion retrospective! – [ Part 3 of 3 ]

The final post about our family reunion planning, our retrospective. What went well and how we plan to improve for the next one!

Family Photo

Our Family!

In my experience of writing software in a team, one of the most important steps – if not the most important – is the capacity to speak objectively (as a team) about the events that led up to the release of the software.

I like to call this the “the good, the bad, and the ugly“.

While the act itself is important as a team learning experience, I believe that the retrospective is critical because it’s another step towards being able to speak objectively and critically in a team setting – an act that promotes “psychological safety” within a team.

Google the term if you want to learn more about high-performing teams, but having worked on a number of them in my career, I’ve always found that the most functional teams I’ve been on have exhibited characteristics of being “psychologically safe”.

Obviously, this takes both comfort and practice, but after 8 years, Sara and I are more than comfortable enough to be able to speak critically of one another, so I’m sharing what we discussed privately in our retrospective of our family reunion.

The Good

If expected outcomes were our measure of success, we definitely succeeded because we fulfilled them all! Not to mention, quite a few family members thanked us for our efforts – that should be one of the first signs that we did a lot of things right.

  • People mingled
  • Took a great family photo
  • Ended up with a lot of corrections to the family tree
  • As an added bonus, got email addresses for a large chunk of the family where I’ve been sending updates about this blog to! Hi fam! 😀

For having only a week’s time to prepare for the 50+ person event, the organizing went extremely smoothly. We weren’t cramming the night before and had spread out the tasks over the entire week.  I attribute this to Sara’s planning / organizing skills because they’re much, much better than mine. Here’s some protips (from Sara) on how to make an event go smoothly:

  • Create a timeline of the day’s events and print out hard-copies to distribute to everyone
  • Put all assets in labeled manila folders to be distributed on the day of the event – the more granular and contextually organized the items, the better.
  • Always carry extra items like pens, post-its, extra copies of print-outs and what not.
  • Pack the night before so you’re not scrambling the morning/day of.

The print out of the family tree definitely worked out better than we imagined. There were a lot of family members who fixed the tree, but it also acted as an event anchor that encouraged interactions between members of our family. If we were to recommend one item to be reused from our reunion, this would be it.

The Bad

There were a few hiccups on the day of the reunion – for one, the venue actually didn’t have the appropriate seating arrangement (nor was it even possible), so we had to move people around 30 minutes before everyone arrived. I won’t lie – it was a bit hectic because there were only two of us that knew all the details. In critical situations, I tend to wear a manager hat and order people around. Ultimately, I have to remember that it’s family and not a place of business – so I don’t think I handled that as well as I could have – since after all, this is supposed to be a fun gathering – who cares about these minor inconveniences. 😀

Second, while we did have a planning schedule, we misplaced it in the chaos and so we  improvised in the moment. As a result, we failed to give detailed instructions to the people at the check-in table. This led to pseudo-random distribution of favors and missed collection of email addresses. Ultimately, this was totally our fault due to the lack of communication. On a good note, we did later remedy the situation by manually walking around the venue and collecting email addresses.

Last, while I tried to stick to the schedule on the sheet that Sara printed out – and I kept reminding myself to, I ended up making up the schedule on the fly. While it worked out this time, in future events, that may not be the case. I really have to get better at sticking to pre-planned schedules. 😀

The Ugly

We have a fairly decent camera, but unfortunately, because of a setting enabled on the camera and the poor lighting in the room, a lot of the pictures came out blurry. This was partly due to the fact that the camera is pretty new, and Sara didn’t have a ton of experience using it. With that said, the group photo of our family was taken by another member so we did end up with a nice photo. We should have taken a few shots the night before and checked them out, but in our haste, we didn’t and ultimately lost a bunch of photos.

What We Would Do Differently

All in all, I think given the circumstances, we planned a great an amazing family reunion, but if we’re never critical of what we’ve done, we’ll never improve. So, here’s a list of items in no particular order of what we would have done differently:

  • Have more people show up early and be involved in the setup. We should have communicated a setup plan the night before with a small group of people instead of shouldering it ourselves.
  • Definitely take some photos the night before to see how the camera would perform.
  • Highlight features of Ancestry.com earlier in the event. We didn’t show all the amazing features of Ancestry until right before the end. There’s a lot of documents that Ancestry has collected that people were interested in such as the census scans, draft cards, yearbook photos, etc. It piqued quite a bit of people’s interest.
  • I really wanted to print out something physical that everyone in the family could take home. While we are giving out a family photo as a prize for this reunion, one of my dreams is to be able to print out family baseball cards where the back of the card would have trivia about a person’s life. One of these days, I tell you…
2 Comments on Our family reunion retrospective! – [ Part 3 of 3 ]

Planning a family reunion – [ Part 2 of 3 ]

Part 2 of our family reunion planning! Including the details of the different pieces we put together and links to download them.

Materials.jpg

Our Guess Who!


Update: If you’re planning on throwing your own family reunion, make sure to check out:

  • Part 1 – We helped organize a family reunion, so can you!
  • Part 3 – Family reunion retrospective aka what we would have done differently

If you read my last post, you’d know that Sara and I were fortunate enough to have been included in the planning stages of a family reunion.  And… if you know me, you’d know that this has something I’d been secretly wanting to do for a number of years.

I can’t really put my finger on why I’ve been so fascinated with learning about my family history, but as I’ve gotten older, I’ve cared less about lives being led on Instagram and more about my family’s history in Hawaii.

To gauge success, I viewed the most important outcome of the reunion as the following:

Family members should interact and meet one another – no matter their lineage. This was most important. If this happened at some level, even if none of the other outcomes occurred, we would have had a successful reunion.

To accomplish this, we focused on three specific facets of the event:

  1. Seating
  2. Interactions
  3. Collaboration

*Note: We’re making all the assets we used in planning this event available in this blog post. Unfortunately, to use them, you’ll need a bit of an Excel background and someone with Adobe InDesign experience.  If you’re planning your next reunion and want a custom design for some of these assets, I hear that for a small fee, Sara might be able to help you out. 😀

Seating

I know how most local family parties end up, and I really wanted to encourage people to meet different members of the family. To help solve the issue of familiarity, we arranged the seating chart so that families would not sit next to their immediate family, but keeping at least one parent and child together as well as spouses if their children were grown adults.

If we made people feel uncomfortable, then I knew we were headed in the right direction. 

If you’ve ever tried to seat a large group, it’s fairly painful without the use of technology, so I made a quick spreadsheet on Google Docs to dynamically show available seats as the seating chart is filled out. (I knew my finance background would be of use someday!) Feel free to customize it to your own liking as I’ve filled it with a bunch of random celebrities. In addition, since there were a ton of people who had never met, we also made name tags for everyone – you’ll find the InDesign templates available at the end of this blog post.

Note: The seating chart is titled “Guest List / Seating Chart“. If you notice, I have the floor plan of the event space where I’ve numbered each seat at a table. We didn’t need this level of granularity to actually seat people, but it really helps to visualize who is sitting where. After you’ve seated everyone, the “Sign-In Sheet” tab dynamically pulls from the seating chart. You’ll want to sort this sheet by “Last Name” (since families arrive together) and print out the result (or copy it to an InDesign template like we did) to use at the sign-in desk.

Interactions

Once everyone has been seated in an uncomfortable spot, we needed people to interact with one another. I’m generally not a fan of forced interactions, but we decided to include two items on the table that would help “kickstart” the conversation.

Conversation Starter

The first item would be a conversation starter, commonly known as an “ice-breaker”. Each conversation starter would be placed at everyone’s seat and have two sections. In the first section, you have to say how you’re related to either my grandmother or one of her sisters.

When thinking about familial relationships (especially when dealing with 2nd / 3rd cousins), it’s always good to have people form a visual baseline of where you are in the family tree.

The second section of the conversation starter would contain questions to ask the table to help keep the flow of the conversation going. Since I’ve been fascinated with recording my own family history, I had a database of almost a thousand questions to pull from. Examples of these questions include:

  • If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?
  • Who is one person here you’d like to learn more about?
  • What was something you got away with as a child that your family still doesn’t know about?

Guess Who?

The second item would be a “Guess Who” game that would be situated as the centerpiece of every table. Once everyone stated where they were in the family, we had pictures of 8 people numbered one through eight. On the table, we had cutouts of those numbers, along with the names of the eight people in the photos and a few extra members of the family to increase difficulty. The idea was for the table to interact (and collaborate) with one another to match the photo to the person. During the reunion, I announced the answers and let the winning table know they would receive a physical copy of the group photo we’d take later in the day.

Collaboration

Since we focused on micro-interactions occurring on the table, I wanted to ensure that the room had something larger to collaborate on at the macro level. Sara and I paid for a subscription to Ancestry.com via a Black Friday deal, and we’ve both spent countless hours attempting to fill in our family’s history. I met with my Aunty Gerry on a Saturday to complete a large chunk of my grandmother’s tree, but we were still missing quite a bit of people / details. The original idea was to show the family tree on a projector, then have people come up and fix the tree on the laptop, but we didn’t think that interaction would go well because of the inherent technology barriers (re: people crowding around a single laptop, using Ancestry’s user-interface, etc).

Instead, Sara painstakingly transcribed the tree from Ancestry.com (which doesn’t have great export options) over to Adobe InDesign where we could then print out a large 8 foot banner of the tree (which costs ~50 dollars). We then had post-it notes for people to fill in corrections. Here’s the before and after of the tree.

As you can see, I think out of all the interactive ideas we had, this was definitely the best one. There were so many family members who came up to fix the tree and add more detailed information! The display became a focal point of the event – where people could get out of their seat (woohoo!), make their corrections, and ultimately talk to other people in the family.

*Note: We used colored post-its to represent gender to make it easier when we placed the corrections back into Ancestry.com

Assets

So to sum it up, here are the assets that we’ve made available to help you plan your next reunion!

Whew.

I know it looks like a lot of work, but it’s definitely worth the effort!

Stay-tuned for my next blog post where I share my thoughts about the reunion and everything that we could improve on for the next one!

Make sure to continue reading:

  • Part 3 – Find out what we would improve on if we could “do it all over again”
2 Comments on Planning a family reunion – [ Part 2 of 3 ]

Type on the field below and hit Enter/Return to search